PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF WORLD CINEMA

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF WORLD CINEMA

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF WORLD CINEMA BY PUJA CHAKRABORTY BHUNIA

Like other major innovations (automobile, electricity, chemicals, airplane) “Cinema” also emerged at the same time. “Cinema” actually changed the fundamental meaning of mass-communication. In both popularity and appeal it was far ahead of other available media of mass-communication. In the late eighteenth century most consumers enjoyed their entertainment in an informal, haphazard and often non-commercial way. When making a trip they could suddenly meet a roadside entertainer, and their villages were often visited by traveling showmen, clowns and troubadours. Seasonal fairs attracted a large variety of musicians, magicians, dancers, fortune-tellers and sword-swallowers.

At the end of the nineteenth century, in the era of the second industrial revolution, falling working hours, rising disposable income, increasing urbanization, rapidly expanding transport networks and strong population growth resulted in a sharp rise in the demand for entertainment. The effect of this boom was further rapid growth of live entertainment through process innovations. And from that day the countdown began….the first rotating camera for taking panning shots was built in 1897. The first film studios were built in 1897. Special effects were introduced and film continuity, involving action moving from one sequence into another, began to be used. The first use of animation in movies was in 1899. The first feature length multi-reel film was a 1906 Australian production. The first successful permanent theatre showing only films was “The Nickelodeon” in Pittsburgh in 1905. By 1910, actors began to receive screen credit for their roles, and the way to the creation of film stars was opened.

Until 1927, motion pictures were produced without sound. This era is referred to as the silent era of Film. The first feature film originally presented as a talkiewas The Jazz Singer, released in October 1927. A major hit, it was made with Vitaphone, which was at the time the leading brand of sound-on-disc technology.  By the end of 1929, Hollywood was almost all-talkie, with several competing sound systems. After the mid-1950s, real revenue from movie stabilized, and remained the same, with some fluctuations, until the mid-1990s. The decline in screens was more limited. After 1963 the number of screens increased again steadily to reach nearly twice the 1945 level in the 1990s. Since the 1990s there have been more movie screens in the U.S. than ever before. The proliferation of screens, coinciding with declining capacity per screen, facilitated market segmentation.

Although technically, the new millennium dawned on January 1st 2001, the new decade of films (and film history) began on January 1, 2000. It began with trumped fears over Y2K and major terrorists attacks on 9/11/2001, was marked at its midpoint with the devastating natural disasters of the Asian tsunami of 2004 and of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and ended with the financial meltdown of the economy (the second crash and recession of the decade). The end of the decade was punctuated by James Cameron’s revolutionary and major blockbuster film Avatar (2009), the highest grossing (domestic) film of 2009 – and of the decade. [It became only the fifth film in movie history to exceed $1 billion in worldwide grosses, and did so in less than 3 weeks.] The film soon surpassed the highest-grossing (worldwide) film of all-time – Cameron’s own Titanic (1997).

Let’s have a look to the table of top grossing movies of each year from 1995 to 2018

Year Movie Categorization


Creative Type
Production Method
Source
Genre

MPAA
Rating

 

Distributor Total for Year Total in 2017 dollars Tickets Sold
1995 Batman Forever Super Hero
Live Action
Original Screenplay
Action
PG-13 Warner Bros. $184,031,112 $379,484,838 42,306,002
1996 Independence Day Science Fiction
Live Action
Original Screenplay
Adventure
PG-13 20th Century Fox $306,169,255 $621,343,486 69,269,062
1997 Men in Black Science Fiction
Live Action
Based on Comic/Graphic Novel
Adventure
PG-13 Sony Pictures $250,650,052 $489,832,450 54,607,854
1998 Titanic Historical Fiction
Live Action
Original Screenplay
Thriller/Suspense
PG-13 Paramount Pictures $443,319,081 $847,883,186 94,524,324
1999 Star Wars Ep. I: The Phantom Menace Science Fiction
Animation/Live Action
Original Screenplay
Adventure
PG 20th Century Fox $430,443,350 $760,054,490 84,732,942
2000 How the Grinch Stole Christmas Kids Fiction
Live Action
Based on Fiction Book/Short Story
Adventure
PG Universal $253,367,455 $421,652,324 47,006,948
2001 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone Fantasy
Animation/Live Action
Based on Fiction Book/Short Story
Adventure
PG Warner Bros. $300,404,434 $476,082,642 53,074,988
2002 Spider-Man Super Hero
Live Action
Based on Comic/Graphic Novel
Adventure
PG-13 Sony Pictures $403,706,375 $623,278,172 69,484,746
2003 Finding Nemo Kids Fiction
Digital Animation
Original Screenplay
Adventure
G Walt Disney $339,714,367 $505,346,245 56,337,374
2004 Shrek 2 Kids Fiction
Digital Animation
Based on Fiction Book/Short Story
Adventure
PG Dreamworks SKG $441,226,247 $637,326,797 71,050,925
2005 Star Wars Ep. III: Revenge of the Sith Science Fiction
Animation/Live Action
Original Screenplay
Adventure
PG-13 20th Century Fox $380,270,577 $532,141,501 59,324,582
2006 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest Historical Fiction
Live Action
Based on Theme Park Ride
Adventure
PG-13 Walt Disney $423,315,812 $579,716,461 64,628,368
2007 Spider-Man 3 Super Hero
Live Action
Based on Comic/Graphic Novel
Adventure
PG-13 Sony Pictures $336,530,303 $438,761,163 48,914,288
2008 The Dark Knight Super Hero
Live Action
Based on Comic/Graphic Novel
Action
PG-13 Warner Bros. $531,001,578 $663,382,198 73,955,652
2009 Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen Science Fiction
Animation/Live Action
Based on TV
Action
PG-13 Paramount Pictures $402,111,870 $480,925,797 53,614,916
2010 Toy Story 3 Kids Fiction
Digital Animation
Original Screenplay
Adventure
G Walt Disney $415,004,880 $471,811,631 52,598,844
2011 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II Fantasy
Animation/Live Action
Based on Fiction Book/Short Story
Adventure
PG-13 Warner Bros. $381,011,219 $430,979,904 48,046,812
2012 The Avengers Super Hero
Animation/Live Action
Based on Comic/Graphic Novel
Action
PG-13 Walt Disney $623,279,547 $702,364,007 78,301,450
2013 Iron Man 3 Super Hero
Animation/Live Action
Based on Comic/Graphic Novel
Action
PG-13 Walt Disney $408,992,272 $451,249,771 50,306,552
2014 Guardians of the Galaxy Super Hero
Animation/Live Action
Based on Comic/Graphic Novel
Action
PG-13 Walt Disney $333,055,258 $365,667,764 40,765,637
2015 Star Wars Ep. VII: The Force Awakens Science Fiction
Animation/Live Action
Original Screenplay
Adventure
PG-13 Walt Disney $742,208,942 $789,752,572 88,043,765
2016 Finding Dory Kids Fiction
Digital Animation
Original Screenplay
Adventure
PG Walt Disney $486,295,561 $504,285,686 56,219,140
2017 Star Wars Ep. VIII: The Last Jedi Science Fiction
Live Action
Original Screenplay
Adventure
PG-13 Walt Disney $517,218,368 $517,218,363 57,660,910
2018 Black Panther Super Hero
Live Action
Based on Comic/Graphic Novel
Action
PG-13 Walt Disney $700,059,566 $700,059,566 78,044,544

 

 

In the 21st century, cinema is no longer confined to a theatrical setting. With consumers seeking content via myriad distribution outlets, creators are working hard to maintain artistic intent in an ever-evolving landscape. Today in this digital age cinema also facing a challenge to survive. The great Steven Spielberg told, “The internet is going to effect the most profound change on the entertainment industries combined. I think cinema is going to tailor itself to the individual audience. It is going to cater to the individual consumer: there’s going to be something for everybody and we have to be prepared for entertainment coming at us in many different shapes and genres”.

Here we have the frequency of going to movie theatres to see a movie among adults as of October 2018

Traditionally, war films, musicals and historical dramas have been the most popular genres, but franchise films have been among the best performers in the 21st century around the world. Here we have small list of box office revenue of top grossing films in 2000s.

Previously the production houses did not look after so much on their advertising but gradually the total scenario has changed and now it has turned 180 degree. Today advertising or promotion has become an important part of cinema.

Cinema advertising expenditure from 2010 to 2020

BOX OFFICE REVENUE OF TOP GROSSING MOVIES IN BOLLYWOOD IN 2000s

BOX OFFICE REVENUE OF TOP GROSSING MOVIES IN HOLLYWOOD IN 2000s

Now a days watching movies has become easier.  With the advent of internet and mobile phones, we now get access to the cinema on our mobile screens and can watch them just about anywhere and anytime. However, because of the internet, Netflix, streaming, cinema is dissolving, the big screen is shattering into many little screens, and this is causing much stress amongst movie-nostalgia hardliners. Everyone is expected to do more in less time. New technologies and developments are creating efficiencies, but the demand for content has never been greater.

Art is ever changing, thus changing the way we see the world, making us dream about new things, among them there are new technologies, that can change the art… and thus the cycle will continue…

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